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Margit Bueckert

Obituary of Margit Marianne Bueckert

Margit Marianne Bueckert

NOVEMBER 24, 1936 - APRIL 27, 2021

Our mother, Margit Marianne (Frank) Bueckert was born to Anton and Marie (Hofmann) Frank on November 24, 1936 in Petersdorf, Czechoslovakia. She quietly slipped away to join Dad in the early morning of April 27, 2021, due to complications of old age.

Mom's life was one of adventure, beginning with fleeing from Europe with her parents at the age of two and a half years, just before the onset of World War II. The family was settled in northern Saskatchewan where they worked hard to make a home and a living in a new and strange land. Mom attended a one-room school for eight years, together with her younger sister Linda and brother Oswald, getting there on foot or horseback. Once school days were over, Mom had several babysitting/nanny jobs which she enjoyed, then went on to waitressing in a café in Elrose, SK. Here she met our Dad, Henry Bueckert, who became the love of her life. They were married on June 2, 1958, at Loon Lake, Saskatchewan, where they began their married life. Later on, when Dad's work brought them to Alberta, they became acquainted with people from the Church of God in Christ, Mennonite. In the course of time, they relocated to Linden, Alberta, where Mom answered the call of God and together with Dad was baptized on December 30, 1962. Several years later Dad and Mom were asked to serve a term at the Hilltop Mission children's home in Fort Vermilion, arriving there in July of 1967. After their time on the mission was over, Fort Vermilion became home for the rest of their lives. They bought a small farm and, together with their family of six, worked hard to make a living. Mom had a strong work ethic, which was passed on to her family, as they learned to make do with little. She was well-known for having a large and bountiful garden and many beautiful flowers. Every year when berry picking season came around, we spent days picking wild saskatoons. She taught us girls the values and joys of homemaking, but more importantly how to be of service to the community. Countless hours were spent in helping and cheering lonely lives through housecleaning and painting, bringing food and singing, and sharing what we had. During the years of running a small dairy, Mom had a steady stream of customers at the door wanting to purchase the butter and cottage cheese she would make, along with milk and cream.

When Dad was ordained to the ministry, she stood by his side and faithfully tried to fill her place. Amid the tests of life, her faith held.

Mom had a true servant heart and lived a life of service for others. She enjoyed meeting people from all walks of life and making new friends. She will long be remembered for all the baking she brought to Long Term Care during a time of volunteer service at the hospital. In 2005, Mom fulfilled a lifelong dream of going back to her homeland when our parents travelled to Germany and Austria, meeting relatives that she only knew through letter correspondence. In later life, as Dad's health deteriorated, she was his constant caregiver even with her own health compromised. As the ravages of rheumatoid arthritis took their toll and the need for hospitalization became necessary, Mom's acceptance shone through; the needs of those around remained her focus, endearing her to the doctor and nurses providing care. Those last precious days spent with our mother will forever be cherished.